IWKS 2100: Human-Centered Design, Innovation and Prototyping

Introduces collaborative interdisciplinary design and innovation from a human perspective. Using the wide array of Inworks prototyping facilities, teams of students will design and implement human-oriented projects of increasing scale and complexity, in the process acquiring essential innovation and problem-solving skills.

Prerequisite: None; no previous design or prototyping experience is expected or required

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 2200: Theoretical Foundations of Innovation

Explores what it means to think and see the world as a designer. Critically examines technologies in ubiquitous everyday use, as well as how these technologies impact work lives, sense of self, and human social systems including education, government, healthcare and finance. Considers how such technologies and systems are customized and “hacked,” and investigates what it means to be a designer of systems that other people must use.

Prerequisite: None

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 2300: Computational Foundations of Innovation

Provides a broad introduction to the technological underpinnings of modern society, introducing the fundamental principles of computer science. Students create realistic artifacts, and imbue those artifacts with interesting behavior, by writing computer programs in on-line virtual world similar to Second Life, and for simple Arduino-connected devices. In-class and in-world discussions and readings introduce important computer science ideas and concepts. Completion of this course will prepare students for more advanced IWKS courses that require knowledge of computing principles and practices.

Prerequisite: None

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 3100: 3D Design and Prototyping

Introduces the design and computer-controlled fabrication of three dimensional objects using both additive (3D printing) and subtractive (laser cutter, CNC router / milling machine) processes. Various commercial and open-source software tools for 3D design (CAD), manufacturing (CAM) and visualization will be explored. Increasingly complex projects throughout the semester will be used to illustrate fabrication techniques. The course will culminate in a final project.

Prerequisite: None

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 3200: Health Data Science

Introduces techniques for capturing, processing, visualizing, and making meaning out of large health-focused datasets. With the exponential growth and decreasing cost of data collection tools such as genome sequencing, mobile phone health trackers, remote sensors, and electronic and personal medical records to name a few, the demand for data scientists to help find meaning in a sea of data has never been greater. This course will introduce the fundamentals of working with health data and large data sets, introduce widely-used data analysis and visualization tools, and culminate in a cumulative health data project.

Prerequisite: IWKS 2200 & 2300 (students who have not taken these courses should consult the instructor)

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 3300: NAND to Tetris Foundations of Computer Systems

Introduces the principles and technologies that underlie the global information age. Starting from first principles, students gradually construct a fully functional simulated hardware platform, together with a modern software hierarchy, yielding a working basic yet powerful computer system. In the process of building this computer system, students gain a first-hand understanding of how hardware and software systems are designed and how they work together as one enterprise. The course involves considerable software development in the form of a series of laboratory assignments of increasing complexity, but requires only introductory programming experience.

Prerequisite: IWKS 2300 or similar computing experience

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 3400: Game Design and Development I Principles of Computer Game Development

Introduces the fundamental principles of computer game development, including the rich interplay of computer science, graphics design, physics, music, and narrative that comprise modern computer games. Students develop interactive 2D and simple 3D games in laboratory assignments of increasing complexity. The course involves considerable software development, but requires only introductory programming experience (e.g., IWKS 2300). Culminates with a final project consisting of a team-developed complete game.

Prerequisite: IWKS 2300 or similar computing experience

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 3550: Innovation Law and Policy

Introduces legal and regulatory foundations related to innovation, including intellectual property, telecommunications, electronic commerce and the Internet, biotechnology, ethical and equity considerations, and the financing of innovative ventures. The course examines these issues from the diverse perspectives of the legal, business, capital, development, consumer, and policy-making communities.

Prerequisite: IWKS 2200

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 3650: Mobile App Development

Introduces mobile application development, including front-end mobile application clients, data handling, connectivity to back-end services and cloud hosting. The course provides an overview and comparison of technical approaches employed by Apple iOS, Google Android and Microsoft Windows. Students will install, develop, test, and distribute mobile applications while addressing challenges associated with development for any mobile platform: limited screen size and memory, gesture based GUI, varying connectivity, and the wide variety of target mobile devices.

Prerequisite: IWKS 2300 or similar computing experience

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 4100: Advanced Human-Centered Design and Prototyping

An advanced exploration of design thinking and the user-centered design paradigm from a broad range of perspectives, emphasizing how user research and prototype assessment can be integrated into different phases of the design process. Using a team-based, project-oriented approach, students will develop advanced expertise in the design, development, and critique of solutions to important human problems. The course will make full use of Inworks’ prototyping facilities.

Prerequisite: IWKS 2100 & 3100

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 4120: Physical Computing and the Internet of Things

Introduces techniques for (1) designing cyber-physical systems that can sense and respond to humans in meaningful ways, (2) creating networks of physical objects that collect and exchange data, and (3) for creating autonomous artifacts. Examples of such systems include interactive art, wearable health monitors and game playing robots. Working individually and in teams, students develop projects using Inworks’ materials, devices and fabrication tools, culminating with a final project of the students’ choosing. The course involves considerable prototyping and software development, but requires only introductory programming and prototyping experience.

Prerequisite: IWKS 2100 & 2300

Credit hours: 4

IWKS 4400: Game Design and Development II Advanced Computer Game Development

Continuation of IWKS 3400, with increased emphasis on more advanced techniques including 3D rendering; multimodal music, complex narrative, animation, non-player AI, and advanced 3D techniques including diffuse, ambient, specular, and emissive lighting; vertex, pixel and geometry shaders; shadows; terrain building; reflective and refractive lighting; bump, parallax, and parallax occlusion mapping; Phong and Gouraud shading; “cel” shading; ray tracing; bloom; and high dynamic range lighting.

Prerequisite: IWKS 3400

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 4500: Biomedical Innovation and Design

Introduces the biodesign innovation process, which involves identifying important biomedical needs and inventing meaningful solutions to address them. The course examines the design, development and commercialization of innovative medical technologies in a variety of contexts, and explores how these processes can vary across disciplines, geographies and demographics. Working individually and in teams, students explore the many factors that shape healthcare innovation, and through hands-on team-based design projects, invent their own solutions that serve clinical or other biomedical needs.

Prerequisite: IWKS 3100 & 3200

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 4520: Designing for Healthful Human Longevity

Explores the history of life-extension efforts, as well as present day technologies, companies, and organizations that seek to extend healthy human lifespans. Survey of the current state of the field, currently recognized barriers to success, and the ethical and equity considerations associated with success. Examination of leading theories of aging, current research in model organisms, and emerging techniques and technologies. The course will require a significant amount of reading and in-class discussion/debate.

Prerequisite: IWKS 2100 & 2200

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 4600: Innovating for the Developing World

Explores the design and development of products and services that can be sustainably and gainfully used by the world’s poorest citizens. Students in interdisciplinary teams design, implement and evaluate a viable solution to a real problem faced by real people in the developing world. The goal is to develop an understanding of the extraordinary challenges faced by individuals for whom basic survival is not a given, and the knowledge and skills necessary to create designs that respond appropriately to those unique circumstances. Provides a foundation for further study and practice in the area of technology and development.

Prerequisite: IWKS 3500 & 3600

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 4700: Online Instructional Design

Explores how design-thinking and user-centered design can be used to develop and improve technology-mediated learning. Using a team-based project-oriented approach, students design, develop, and evaluate new modalities for digital education. Projects will include ways to educate general audiences as well as targeted ones, such as employees, customers, or medical patients.

Prerequisite: IWKS 2200

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 4800: StartUp - So You Want to be an Entrepreneur?

Explores the entire entrepreneurial cycle, from inspiration to IPO. Student teams create and launch an innovative company in a semester. Culminates in a “pitchfest” to area entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. One of two alternative capstone courses for the Inworks Minor in Design and Innovation.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Inworks HCDI minor or certificate, or instructor permission; Completion of at least three other Inworks courses recommended

Credit hours: 4

IWKS 4900: Undergraduate Capstone

Working closely with project sponsors, students design, implement, and evaluate a project for use by a local company or non-profit organization. One of two alternative capstone courses for the Inworks Minor in Design and Innovation.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Inworks HCDI minor or certificate, or instructor permissionCompletion of at least three other Inworks courses recommended

Credit hours: 4

 

IWKS 4930Special Topics

Emergent issues and professional developments in design, innovation and prototyping. Consult the current online Inworks Course List for semester offerings as new special topics courses are frequently added. With permission, may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: Permission of an Inworks faculty member.

Credit hours: 1-4 (Variable)

 

IWKS 4970Independent Study

Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by an Inworks faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to design, innovation and prototyping. With permission, may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: Permission of an Inworks faculty member.

Credit hours: 1-4 (Variable)

 

IWKS 5100: Human-Centered Design, Innovation and Prototyping

Offers a graduate-level introduction to collaborative interdisciplinary design and innovation from a human perspective, as well as introducing key theoretical and computational foundations of innovation. Using the wide array of Inworks prototyping facilities, teams of students will design and implement human-oriented projects of increasing scale and complexity, in the process acquiring essential innovation and problem-solving skills.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; no previous design or prototyping experience is expected or required.

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 5120: Physical Computing and the Internet of Things

Graduate version of IWKS 4120. Introduces techniques for (1) designing cyber-physical systems that can sense and respond to humans in meaningful ways, (2) creating networks of physical objects that collect and exchange data, and (3) for creating autonomous artifacts. Examples of such systems include interactive art, wearable health monitors and game playing robots. Working individually and in teams, students develop projects using Inworks’ materials, devices and fabrication tools, culminating with a final project of the students’ choosing. The course involves considerable prototyping and software development, but requires only introductory programming and prototyping experience.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; IWKS 5100 & some computing experience recommended

Credit hours: 4

 

IWKS 5200: Health Data Science

Graduate version of IWKS 3200. Introduces techniques for capturing, processing, visualizing, and making meaning out of large health-focused datasets. With the exponential growth and decreasing cost of data collection tools such as genome sequencing, mobile phone health trackers, remote sensors, and electronic and personal medical records to name a few, the demand for data scientists to help find meaning in a sea of data has never been greater. This course will introduce the fundamentals of working with health data and large data sets, introduce widely-used data analysis and visualization tools, and culminate in a cumulative health data project.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; some computing experience recommended

Credit hours: 3

IWKS 5300: NAND to Tetris Foundations of Computer Systems

Graduate version of IWKS 3300. Introduces the principles and technologies that underlie the global information age. Starting from first principles, students gradually construct a fully functional simulated hardware platform, together with a modern software hierarchy, yielding a working basic yet powerful computer system. In the process of building this computer system, students gain a first-hand understanding of how hardware and software systems are designed and how they work together as one enterprise. The course involves considerable software development in the form of a series of laboratory assignments of increasing complexity, but requires only introductory programming experience. Graduate students will implement additional functionality, including network communication and FPGA implementation.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; some computing experience recommended

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 5400: Game Design and Development II

Graduate version of IWKS 4400. Builds upon IWKS 3400, with increased emphasis on more advanced techniques including 3D rendering; multimodal music, complex narrative, animation, non-player AI, and advanced 3D techniques including diffuse, ambient, specular, and emissive lighting; vertex, pixel and geometry shaders; shadows; terrain building; reflective and refractive lighting; bump, parallax, and parallax occlusion mapping; Phong and Gouraud shading; cel shading; ray tracing; bloom; and high dynamic range lighting.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; prior experience in game development recommended

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 5500: Biomedical Innovation and Design

Graduate version of IWKS 4500. Introduces the biodesign innovation process, which involves identifying important biomedical needs and inventing meaningful solutions to address them. The course examines the design, development and commercialization of innovative medical technologies in a variety of contexts, and explores how these processes can vary across disciplines, geographies and demographics. Working individually and in teams, students explore the many factors that shape healthcare innovation, and through hands-on team-based design projects, invent their own solutions that serve clinical or other biomedical needs.

Prerequisite: Graduate standingIWKS 5100 & 5200 recommended

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 5520: Designing for Healthful Human Longevity

Graduate version of IWKS 4520. Explores the history of life-extension efforts, as well as present day technologies, companies, and organizations that seek to extend healthy human lifespans. Survey of the current state of the field, currently recognized barriers to success, and the ethical and equity considerations associated with success. Examination of leading theories of aging, current research in model organisms, and emerging techniques and technologies. The course will require a significant amount of reading and in-class discussion/debate.

Prerequisite: Graduate standingIWKS 5100 recommended

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 5550: Innovation Law and Policy

Graduate version of IWKS 3550. Introduces legal and regulatory foundations related to innovation, including intellectual property, telecommunications, electronic commerce and the Internet, biotechnology, ethical and equity considerations, and the financing of innovative ventures. The course examines these issues from the diverse perspectives of the legal, business, capital, development, consumer, and policy-making communities.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; IWKS 5100 recommended

Credit hours: 3

IWKS 5600: Innovating for the Developing World

Graduate version of IWKS 4600. Explores the design and development of products and services that can be sustainably and gainfully used by the world’s poorest citizens. Students in interdisciplinary teams design, implement and evaluate a viable solution to a real problem faced by real people in the developing world. The goal is to develop an understanding of the extraordinary challenges faced by individuals for whom basic survival is not a given, and the knowledge and skills necessary to create designs that respond appropriately to those unique circumstances. Provides a foundation for further study and practice in the area of technology and development.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; IWKS 5100 recommended

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 5650: Mobile App Development

Graduate version of IWKS 3650. Introduces mobile application development, including front-end mobile application clients, data handling, connectivity to back-end services and cloud hosting. The course provides an overview and comparison of technical approaches employed by Apple iOS, Google Android and Microsoft Windows. Students will install, develop, test, and distribute mobile applications while addressing challenges associated with development for any mobile platform: limited screen size and memory, gesture based GUI, varying connectivity, and the wide variety of target mobile devices.

Prerequisite: Graduate standingIWKS 5300 or 5120 recommended

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 5700: Online Instructional Design

Graduate version of IWKS 4700. Explores how design-thinking and user-centered design can be used to develop and improve technology-mediated learning. Using a team-based project-oriented approach, students design, develop, and evaluate new modalities for digital education. Projects will include ways to educate general audiences as well as targeted ones, such as employees, customers, or medical patients.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; IWKS 2200 or equivalent recommended

Credit hours: 3

 

IWKS 5800: StartUp

So You Want to be an Entrepreneur?

Graduate version of IWKS 4800. Explores the entire entrepreneurial cycle, from inspiration to IPO. Student teams create and launch an innovative company in a semester. Culminates in a “pitchfest” to area entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. One of two alternative capstone courses for the Inworks Graduate Certificate in Design and Innovation.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing & enrollment in the Inworks graduate certificate, or instructor permission;  Completion of at least two other Inworks courses recommended

Credit hours: 4

 

IWKS 5900: Graduate Capstone

Graduate version of IWKS 4900. Working closely with project sponsors, students design, implement, and evaluate a project for use by a local company or non-profit organization. the Inworks Graduate Certificate in Design and Innovation.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing & enrollment in the Inworks graduate certificate, or instructor permission; Completion of at least two other Inworks courses recommended

Credit hours: 4

 

IWKS 5930Special Topics

Emergent issues and professional developments in design, innovation and prototyping. Consult the current online Inworks Course List for semester offerings as new special topics courses are frequently added. With permission, may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Credit hours: 1-4 (Variable)

 

IWKS 5970Independent Study

Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by an Inworks faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to design, innovation and prototyping. With permission, may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing & permission of an Inworks faculty member

Credit hours: 1-4 (Variable)