Past Inworks Courses - Fall 2016


IWKS 2100  | Human-Centered Design, Innovation and Prototyping: Exercising Prototyping Practices with Digital Fabrication Technologies

Introduces strategic collaborative design principles for interdisciplinary project development. Key topics include design-thinking, rapid prototyping, mass customization and aspects of problem-solving.  A series of human-prioritized projects in varying scales will fuel the exploration of iterative design approaches driven by automated fabrication techniques (utilizing lab processes such as 3d printing, laser-cutting and CNC machining). Using the Inworks prototyping facilities, teams of students will design and implement a series of increasingly complex projects, in the process acquiring essential innovation and problem-solving skills. The course will culminate in a final project chosen by each team.

Recommended background: None. Participants of all backgrounds are encouraged to register; no previous design or prototyping experience is required.  

Credit hours: 4


IWKS 2200 | Technology and Society: The Interaction of Technology and Human Social Systems

Explores the personal, societal and global impact of technology, particularly information and communication technology, with emphasis on the technological, social and political changes that underlie the global information age. Topics include: digital identity; digital media creation, transmission and performance; online electronic entertainment, especially games; security, surveillance and privacy; technology and the law; social media and networking; and the impact of information technology on human social systems including healthcare, education, finance, and government.

Recommended background: None.  

Credit hours: 3


IWKS 3100  |   3D Design Prototyping: Fundamentals of Digitally-Fabricated Forms

Introduces the design and (computer-controlled) fabrication of three dimensional objects using both additive (3D printing) and subtractive (laser cutter, CNC router / milling machine) processes. Various commercial and open-source software tools for 3D design (CAD), manufacturing (CAM) and visualizing will be explored. Projects throughout semester will increasingly build upon instructed aspects (stimulating iterative approaches) and culminate in a final project intended to convey conceptual grasp of chosen fabrication method. Students are individually responsible (outside of class) to fulfill basic lab safety training requirements to utilize Inworks prototyping lab within first 10 days of semester. Recommended background: IWKS 2100 & 2300, or permission of the Instructor.

Participants of all backgrounds are encouraged to register; no previous design or prototyping experience is required.  Credit hours: 3

 


IWKS 3300  |   NAND to Tetris: Introduction to the Technical Foundations of the Digital Age

Introduces the principles and technologies that underlie the global information age.  Starting from first principles, students gradually construct a fully functional hardware platform, together with a modern software hierarchy, yielding a working basic yet powerful computer system. In the process of building this computer system, students gain a first-hand understanding of how hardware and software systems are designed and how they work together as one enterprise. The course involves modest software development in the form of a series of laboratory assignments of increasing complexity, but requires only introductory programming experience (e.g., IWKS 2300).

Recommended background: IWKS 2300 or permission of the Instructor  Credit hours: 3


 

IWKS 3400  |  Game Design and Development I:  Principles of Computer Game Development

Introduces the fundamental principles of computer game development, including the rich interplay of computer science, graphics design, physics, music, and narrative that comprise game development. Students will use modern tools to develop interactive 2D and simple 3D games. The course involves substantial software development in the form of a series of laboratory assignments of increasing complexity, but requires only introductory programming experience (e.g., IWKS 2300).  Culminates with a final project consisting of a team-developed complete game. 

Recommended background: Some programming experience, e.g., IWKS 2300, or permission of the Instructor. Credit hours: 3


IWKS 5100  |   Human-Centered Design, Innovation and Prototyping: Exercising Prototyping Practices with Digital Fabrication Technologies

Graduate version of IWKS 2100. Introduces strategic collaborative design principles for interdisciplinary project development. Key topics include design-thinking, rapid prototyping, mass customization and aspects of problem-solving.  A series of advanced human-prioritized projects in varying scales will fuel theexploration of iterative design approaches driven by automated fabrication techniques (utilizing lab processes such as 3d printing, laser-cutting and CNC machining). Using the Inworks prototyping facilities, teams of students will design and implement a series of increasingly complex projects, in the process acquiring essential innovation and problem-solving skills. The course will culminate in a final project chosen by each team.

Recommended background: None. Participants of all backgrounds are encouraged to register; no previous design or prototyping experience is required.  Credit hours: 4


IWKS 5300: NAND to Tetris: Introduction to the Technical Foundations of the Digital Age

Graduate version of IWKS 3300. Introduces the principles and technologies that underlie the global information age.  Starting from first principles, students gradually construct a fully functional hardware platform, together with a modern software hierarchy, yielding a working basic yet powerful computer system. In the process of building this computer system, students gain a first-hand understanding of how hardware and software systems are designed and how they work together as one enterprise. The course involves modest software development in the form of a series of laboratory assignments of increasing complexity, but requires only introductory programming experience (e.g., IWKS 2300). Graduate students will implement additional functionality, including network communication and FPGA implementation. 

Recommended background: IWKS 2300 or permission of the Instructor  Credit hours: 3


IWKS 4930/5930: Special Topics

·      Indigenous Knowledge and Pedagogy

·      Weapons of Mass Destruction

·      Multimodal Interaction for Music

·      (5930 – Graduate Only) Design Thinking, Innovation, and Practice Engaged Research

·      (5930 – Graduate Only) Integrated Construction Leadership

·      GIS in Indigenous Studies